Go Ask Alice

In the first couple of years after my second child was born, I seemed to go down the Rabbit hole. I spent most of my time in the house, juggling multiple conflicting nap schedules and meal times (including my own). It was an insular, mad, and erratic world punctuated by diaper changes, drives to and from preschool, the store, or the park.
I had little time, in fact, for any shopping or journeying beyond the five-mile radius around our home.
So, I remember the first time I went clothes shopping, I was in shock.
What were all these women doing flipping through hangars and chatting away on cell phones. Sure, I had a cell phone, but I barely had a free hand or brainwave. Women can’t just enjoy shopping? For their own clothes? By themselves?
Why ‘be’ anywhere else?
Now, I’ve grown used to seeing distracted shoppers, and I actually prefer those who text because at least I can linger over my own potential purchases in peace. And, I’ve started noticing the outer fringes of a backlash.
On a few boutique doors in Belvedere Square and at Greenspring Station, signs hang on the glass front door: “Please, Just Hang up and Shop.”

Top Picks for Kids’ Flicks

These are my top picks for children’s movies, necessarily in that order:

1.    Mary Poppins
2.    The Wizard of Oz
3.    Toy Story (w/ sequels)
4.    Aladdin
5.    Up
6.    Charlotte’s Web
7.    Babe (not the sequel)
8.    Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (Disney’s first animated version)
9.    Chitty Chitty Bang Bang
10.   The Incredibles
11.   Night at the Museum
12.   How to Train Your Dragon
13.  The Little Mermaid
14.  Lady and the Tramp

What didn’t make the list as too contrived, too violent, or too commercial, yet with some redeeming qualities:
Shrek, Bambi, Old Yeller, and Stuart Little.

And lastly, movies for older kids, and kid oldsters: the Marx Bros.’ Duck Soup, The Princess Bride, Stand by Me, Lord of the Rings, Star Wars, Men in Black, and The Three Stooges oeuvre.

Any I missed?????

How People Move

A woman wears Uggs, feet splayed, head forward and thumbs typing out a text message.

Another woman in uniform walks purposefully–arms swinging, shoulders, hunched up around her ears.

A teacher clutches books, head high, strutting in high-heeled boots.

All people walking with purpose or without. Some with their minds detached, in another place. Others with their minds on where they are going or the problems ahead.

Few being in their bodies, just where they are.